Horse breed – Akhal Teke http://akhalteke.org/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 05:17:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://akhalteke.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-15-1-150x150.png Horse breed – Akhal Teke http://akhalteke.org/ 32 32 The Ancient Greek Horse Breed That Still Exists Today (VIDEO) — Greek City Times https://akhalteke.org/the-ancient-greek-horse-breed-that-still-exists-today-video-greek-city-times/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 11:31:41 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/the-ancient-greek-horse-breed-that-still-exists-today-video-greek-city-times/ The species of small body of the Skyrian horse, whose origins go back to Ancient Greece, is one of the rarest horse breeds in the world. He was originally from Greece and in ancient times lived throughout the country. Currently, it is estimated that there are only around 300 Skyrian horses left in the world, […]]]>

The species of small body of the Skyrian horse, whose origins go back to Ancient Greece, is one of the rarest horse breeds in the world.

He was originally from Greece and in ancient times lived throughout the country.

Currently, it is estimated that there are only around 300 Skyrian horses left in the world, of which more than 220 live in Greece.

Of Greece’s 220 horses, 152 live on the sporadic island of Skiros.

The Skyrian horse is a protected species and the Skyrian Horse Society is a non-profit organization established in 2006 with the aim of ensuring the development of a pedigree for the horse.

Skyrian horses are friendly, social, hardy, and intelligent animals; they are a particularly friendly breed with a maximum height of 116cm. and the body type is similar to that of the large horse.

The head is beautiful and the mane is long and richly colored – usually in a shade darker than the color of the skin.

A special feature are the hairs on the fetlocks, the so-called feathers. The color is usually a reddish-brown or maroon, sometimes white or gray-brown, rarely blonde hue.

The Skyrian horse (Eguus Cabalus Skyros Pony) is one of the native breeds of horses that lived throughout Greece in ancient times, and there is a theory that it is a representative of the Pindos Pony family.

Ancient legend holds that they are a descendant of the horses Achilles took with him to Troy, and related to the horses of Alexander the Great and those depicted as taking part in the Panathinea procession depicted on the Parthenon frieze.

Xi Jinping offers to help Greece recover disputed Parthenon Marbles

Some scientists believe that Skyrian horses are related to the race of small mountain horses that migrated from Alaska along the Siberian plateau and reached Europe around 12,000 years ago.

They are believed to have been brought to the island of Skyros by Athenian immigrants in the 5th century BC.

READ MORE: The traditional fishing of the Missolonghi lagoon enters the National Index of Intangible Cultural Heritage.

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Rare Greek Island Horse Breed Needs Help To Survive https://akhalteke.org/rare-greek-island-horse-breed-needs-help-to-survive/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:29:17 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/rare-greek-island-horse-breed-needs-help-to-survive/ A rare and endangered breed of horse, indigenous to Greece since ancient times, is under threat after a difficult year. The endangered Skyrian horse is one of the rarest horse breeds in the world with around 260 in Greece. Most of the horses, 187 to be exact, live on the Aegean island of Skyros. But […]]]>

A rare and endangered breed of horse, indigenous to Greece since ancient times, is under threat after a difficult year.

The endangered Skyrian horse is one of the rarest horse breeds in the world with around 260 in Greece. Most of the horses, 187 to be exact, live on the Aegean island of Skyros.

But after a tough year that included intense heat, heavy rainfall and strong winds, the horses face a tough winter.

A group of volunteers who work tirelessly to care for the horses have set up a crowdfunding campaign to help raise much-needed funds.

“It has been a difficult year for many, and like many other conservation and animal welfare projects, the pandemic has affected our income,” Amanda Simpson of the Skyros Island Horse Trust told the Pappas Post. “Unfortunately, our project was also affected by changing weather conditions.”

Simpson said it’s never easy for the project to survive and this has been an extremely difficult year.

“Catastrophic late-season rains followed by intense heat caused a 50 percent drop in the meadow hay harvest in Greece, making animal feed scarce and extremely expensive,” she said.

Simpson says that due to heavy rains at harvest time, oat hay also suffered and irrigated alfalfa prices soared 30 percent due to increased electricity prices in Greece.

“All of this makes our task of feeding 34 endangered Skyrian horses more difficult,” she said.

She and her team are urgently trying to raise $ 13,500 through their crowdfunding campaign to fix shelters and fences and buy a big hay truck. The group tries to protect the 34 endangered Skyrian horses and the two rescue horses in their care.

To learn more about the Skyros Island Horse Trust and the horses they care for, follow them on Facebook and Instagram.


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Horse Breeds Association Recreational Riding Programs https://akhalteke.org/horse-breeds-association-recreational-riding-programs/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/horse-breeds-association-recreational-riding-programs/ There are many advantages to participating in a breed association’s recreational riding program. Photo courtesy of the American Morgan Horse Association Recreational riding programs have long been an essential part of the offerings of most horse breed associations, as they help attract and retain members. Program participants often praise the tracking logs as a way […]]]>
There are many advantages to participating in a breed association’s recreational riding program. Photo courtesy of the American Morgan Horse Association

Recreational riding programs have long been an essential part of the offerings of most horse breed associations, as they help attract and retain members. Program participants often praise the tracking logs as a way to keep track of time spent with their horse, and once milestones are reached, riders are presented with fun and useful prizes.

Unfortunately, many of these programs suffer from low participation rates. Breed associations want to change this by making horse owners aware of the variety of activities they can participate in with their horse. Whichever breed you choose, here’s what three of the country’s top breed associations have to share about their recreational rider programs.

Why participate in recreational horse riding programs?

There are various reasons why a fan of a particular breed of horse should participate in these recreational riding programs.

  • Owning a horse is not mandatory, and multiple horses can help save hours of time to accomplish important goals.
  • Participation time logs help participants keep track of their hours earned.
  • While some associations make a distinction between competitive and non-competitive hours and which can be included, typical examples of eligible hours include those spent hiking, training, participating in parades, taking classes. horse riding, etc.
  • Achieving a milestone level of success offers practical prizes that are different from those typically won in horse shows.
  • There is often no time limit on reaching milestone goals.
  • All costs involved are generally nominal.

Here are some examples of recreational riding programs offered by breed associations:

Appaloosa Horse Club

Keri LeForce, Supervisor of the Appaloosa Horse Club (ApHC) Performance Department, believes that her organization’s Saddle Log / Driving Log program benefits the most ApHC members who do not regularly attend organized events.

“It’s an opportunity for them to get involved in the association and to be recognized for what they do,” she says. “It’s a way for them to maintain a connection with the breed association.”

Participating adult members pay an annual fee of just $ 25, while youth receive a one-time fee of $ 20. Membership in the Appaloosa Horse Club is required and, although ownership of the horse is not required, logged hours must be accrued while riding or riding a registered Appaloosa. Hours are tracked online or through a printable journal.

All program participants receive a patch. Subsequently, chevron bars are earned at the milestone achievement level. Although milestone achievement levels differ between drive and drive programs, common examples include 25, 50, 75, 100, 200, 500, 1,500, 2,000, and 2,500 hours. Examples of prizes won in addition to herringbone bars include brushes with engraved handles and achievement level embroidered items. Any time spent riding or driving, including participating in shows, training and hiking, is eligible to be included in the log and count towards the prizes.

Arab Horse Association

Current members of the Arabian Horse Association who enjoy riding their registered Arabian or Semi-Arabian horse are eligible to participate in the association’s Frequent Rider program. Members collect a one-time fee of $ 25 and log their hours online or through a printable journal. Similar to other breed associations, participants are not required to own their own horse, but can instead record their hours on any number of registered horses.

Recreational Horse Riding Programs for Horse Breeds - Arabic
Current members of the Arabian Horse Association who enjoy riding their registered Arabian or Semi-Arabian horse are eligible to participate in the association’s Frequent Rider program. Photo courtesy of the Arab Horse Association

According to Abby Carpenter, Awards and Show Results Coordinator at the Arabian Horse Association, participating members win awards at achievement levels as high as 25, 100, 250, 500, 1,000, 2,500, 5,000, 7,500 and 10,000 hours. While each level of achievement earns a bridle tag, as the number of hours saved increases so does the value of the prizes, starting with travel mugs and going through photo frames, leather wallets, accessory bags, coolers and even a jacket at the highest level. Like most representatives of breed associations, Carpenter sees the benefit of allowing Arabian horses to promote themselves in a wide variety of recreational equestrian activities and would like to see even more members participate in the program. As an incentive, the AHA has updated a Recreational Riding Program where members will be able to record competition times of open shows, as well as non-competitive times.

American Morgan Horse Association

Recreational riding programs for horse breeds - Morgan
Some key differences in the American Morgan Horse Association program are that membership is not required and any time spent with a Morgan horse, not just time spent riding or riding, counts toward significant achievement. Photo courtesy of the American Morgan Horse Association

Known as My Morgan and Me, the American Morgan Horse Association (AMHA) takes a slightly broader approach to its recreation program. After some trial and error to find the most practical solution to host the program, the latest AMHA program guidelines now require members to submit a payment of $ 25 only when key milestones are reached. Gone are the days of one-time registration fees.

“Some program participants did not submit miles because they were not eligible for a reward,” said Carrie Mortensen, AMHA Executive Director. “It was confusing. Now when you hit a milestone, you send $ 25, whether it takes three years or three days to achieve success.

Participants can download the My Morgan and Me brochure, which includes a printable journal, from the association’s website. But it is not mandatory to use this form.

“When I did, I created my own spreadsheet,” says Mortensen.

Unlike other associations, the AMHA does not require that the logs be submitted when reporting a milestone. Journals are more for the member’s records and benefits.

“It’s an honorary system for us,” Mortensen explained.

Once the achievement has been reported, the participant receives rewards directly from the association’s headquarters or an electronic coupon for the AMHA marketplace where he can purchase t-shirts, sweatshirts and jackets.

“You can decide on the color and whether you want your name embroidered on it,” she adds.

When a participant reaches the highest levels of achievement, for example 10,000 hours, he receives a short report and is featured with his photo in the association’s magazine.

“We love people [of any achievement level] to submit electronic photographs with their application, ”he said. “When a candidate signs up for a milestone, we always feature them on our Facebook page if they include a photo.”

Other key differences in the AMHA program are that membership is not required and any time spent with a Morgan horse, not just time spent riding or riding, counts toward significant achievement.

“The majority of people who participate do not compete, they do trail running,” explains Mortensen. “They hang out with their horse at home. The majority, if they do a show, it is at the local level.

She said Morgan horses often have a long lifespan and the more flexible program requirements allow members to record time spent with an older horse that may no longer be in good condition, but that their owners still want to feel like they’re part of a bigger organization.

Have you participated in a breed organization’s recreational rider program? Tell us more in the comments below.


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Scientists help protect England’s oldest breed of horses https://akhalteke.org/scientists-help-protect-englands-oldest-breed-of-horses/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 09:03:25 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/scientists-help-protect-englands-oldest-breed-of-horses/ Researchers helped safeguard the genetic diversity of England’s oldest established breed of horse, the Cleveland Bay. The Nottingham Trent University study focused on minimizing kinship ties between Cleveland Bay by supporting breeders with historical information about each animal’s parentage through their pedigree records. The work, which spanned nearly 20 years, has reduced the rate of […]]]>

Researchers helped safeguard the genetic diversity of England’s oldest established breed of horse, the Cleveland Bay.

The Nottingham Trent University study focused on minimizing kinship ties between Cleveland Bay by supporting breeders with historical information about each animal’s parentage through their pedigree records.

The work, which spanned nearly 20 years, has reduced the rate of inbreeding in Cleveland Bay horses from more than three percent per generation to less than 0.5% per generation.

Additionally, the population of Cleveland Bays in the UK has grown from 20 in 1994 to over 140 in 2020.

A “Breed Conservation and Management System” has been developed which provides breeding recommendations based on the horses’ genetic history. It offers breeders a simple red, amber and green system depending on whether the horses are related and need to be bred.

“What we have created is like a family tree for the horses of Cleveland Bay,” said Philippe Wilson, researcher at Nottingham Trent University.

“There are serious and growing concerns about genetic diversity in many breeds. Animals are bred for all kinds of business purposes and for particular traits and qualities, but once the genes are gone, they are gone forever.

“If we don’t have enough purebred individuals, or if a male in a small population breeds with many females for example, it can have a deleterious effect on genetic diversity.”

Heritage breed

Cleveland Bay originated three centuries ago in the North East of England, where it was used both as a carriage horse and for working the land.

Since the end of World War I, the breed has undergone a substantial decline in numbers due to the modernization of transportation and the mechanization of agriculture.

By the 1950s he was on the verge of extinction, with only four purebred stallions remaining and is currently one of seven equine breeds listed as priority by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.

“We have created a tool that uses pedigree records and the genetic status of animals to inform breeding strategy,” added Dr Andy Dell, researcher at Nottingham Trent University.

“We have shown that this tool works successfully in improving the genetics of the endangered Cleveland Bay horse population and we can apply our system to other endangered breeds.”

Main image by Colin Green

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From Iceland – Possible new breed of horse in Iceland https://akhalteke.org/from-iceland-possible-new-breed-of-horse-in-iceland/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 11:06:22 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/from-iceland-possible-new-breed-of-horse-in-iceland/ Posted November 18, 2021 photo by Magnús Hlynur Hreiðarsson / Vísir Icelandic horse enthusiasts have encountered an interesting phenomenon: a possible new breed of Icelandic horses in Skaftárhreppur. Currently, horses are being examined to see if their genomes are different from the rest of the horse population in Iceland, Vísir reports. Icelanders give books to […]]]>

Posted November 18, 2021

Reetta Huhta

photo by

Magnús Hlynur Hreiðarsson / Vísir

Icelandic horse enthusiasts have encountered an interesting phenomenon: a possible new breed of Icelandic horses in Skaftárhreppur. Currently, horses are being examined to see if their genomes are different from the rest of the horse population in Iceland, Vísir reports.

Icelanders give books to loved ones on Christmas Eve, a charming festive tradition that you can adopt anywhere in the world. Browse the wonderful Icelandic books in our bookstore and see what literary joy you would love to spread this Christmas.

These horses have lived in isolation at Landbrot in Skaftárhreppur for sixty years. They have never entered a stable, their hooves have never been clipped and their teeth have never been brushed. They also did not receive anthelmintics. The horses are said to be incredibly fit but quite small compared to other Icelandic horses.

For further examination, the horses were transferred to the Árbæjarhjáleiga farm in Holt, where experts are currently taking samples from these horses to determine if they have in fact become another breed. According to one of the specialists, Óðinn Örn Jóhannsson, even if the horses are small, their physical condition is good. He says there is a substantial difference between other Icelandic horses and single horses: “They are like another breed.”

Farm owner Kristin Guðnason says he’s never seen horses like this before. “They are extremely small and there are very few offspring,” he comments. He adds that single horses are friendly with others: “It seems they adapt well to a new environment.


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Scientists help save genetic diversity in oldest established horse breed in England https://akhalteke.org/scientists-help-save-genetic-diversity-in-oldest-established-horse-breed-in-england/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/scientists-help-save-genetic-diversity-in-oldest-established-horse-breed-in-england/ SCIENTISTS have been successful in helping to better safeguard the genetic diversity of England’s oldest established breed of horse, the endangered Cleveland Bay. The study, involving researchers from Nottingham Trent University, focused on minimizing parentage between rare breeds by supporting breeders with historical information about the parentage of individual horses through their pedigree records. The […]]]>

SCIENTISTS have been successful in helping to better safeguard the genetic diversity of England’s oldest established breed of horse, the endangered Cleveland Bay.

The study, involving researchers from Nottingham Trent University, focused on minimizing parentage between rare breeds by supporting breeders with historical information about the parentage of individual horses through their pedigree records.

The team, based at the university’s School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, say this work could be applied to other rare and endangered animal breeds to ensure their genetic status is maintained.

The work, which spanned nearly 20 years, has reduced the rate of inbreeding in Cleveland Bay horses from more than three percent per generation to less than 0.5% per generation.

In addition, the effective population size in the UK – which takes into account unrelated breeding adults in any population – has increased from 20 in 1994 to over 140 in 2020.

The consequences of poor breed and inbreeding management can lead to a variety of serious health problems in individual animals, including fertility issues.

Small populations of animals, as well as larger unmanaged groups, can be in the throes of genetic regression, often due to a lack of reproductive support tools, which are easy to manage.

use and can support decision-making by breeders.

A “Breed Conservation and Management System” (BCAS) has been developed, which provides breeding recommendations based on the horses’ genetic history. It offers breeders a simple red, amber and green system depending on whether the horses are related and need to be bred.

The Cleveland Bay is an original British breed born three centuries ago in the North East of England, where it was used both as a carriage horse and for working the land.

Since the end of World War I, the breed has suffered a substantial decline in numbers due to the modernization of transport and the mechanization of agriculture.

By the 1950s he was on the verge of extinction, with only four purebred stallions remaining and is currently one of seven equine breeds listed as priority by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.

The Cleveland Bay Horse Society published its first herdbook in 1885, containing retrospective pedigrees of animals dating back to 1723; this now results in a non-thoroughbred studbook dating back almost 300 years and spanning 38 generations.

The researchers argue that as a result of this work, Cleveland Bay is now in a genetically sustainable position.

They say their population management tool could be applied to all captive species, from rare and endangered breeds to zoo animals and livestock.

“What we have created is like a family tree for the horses of Cleveland Bay,” said Professor Philippe Wilson, researcher at Nottingham Trent University.

He said: “There are serious and growing concerns about genetic diversity in many breeds. Animals are bred for all kinds of commercial purposes and for particular traits and qualities, but once the genes are gone, they are gone forever.

“If we don’t have enough purebred individuals, or if a male in a small population breeds with many females for example, it can have a deleterious effect on genetic diversity.”

Dr Andy Dell, researcher at Nottingham Trent University, added: “All livestock must be registered by law and we have created a tool that uses pedigree records and the genetic status of animals to inform strategy. breeding. We have shown that this tool works successfully to improve the genetics of the endangered Cleveland Bay horse population and we can apply our system to other endangered breeds. “

The work, which involved the university’s School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, the University of Lincoln and the Cleveland Bay Horse Society, is published in the journal Ecology and Evolution.


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Safeguarding the genetic diversity of the oldest established horse breed in England https://akhalteke.org/safeguarding-the-genetic-diversity-of-the-oldest-established-horse-breed-in-england/ https://akhalteke.org/safeguarding-the-genetic-diversity-of-the-oldest-established-horse-breed-in-england/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 12:35:00 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/safeguarding-the-genetic-diversity-of-the-oldest-established-horse-breed-in-england/ The Cleveland Bay is a British heritage breed that originated three centuries ago. Credit: Colin Green The study, involving researchers from Nottingham Trent University, focused on minimizing parentage between rare breeds by supporting breeders with historical information about the parentage of individual horses via their pedigree records. The team, based at the university’s School of […]]]>

The Cleveland Bay is a British heritage breed that originated three centuries ago. Credit: Colin Green

The study, involving researchers from Nottingham Trent University, focused on minimizing parentage between rare breeds by supporting breeders with historical information about the parentage of individual horses via their pedigree records.

The team, based at the university’s School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, say this work could be applied to other rare and endangered animal breeds to ensure their genetic status is maintained.

The work, which spanned nearly 20 years, has reduced the rate of inbreeding in Cleveland Bay horses from more than three percent per generation to less than 0.5% per generation.

In addition, the effective population size in the UK – which takes into account unrelated breeding adults in any population – has increased from 20 in 1994 to over 140 in 2020.

The consequences of poor breed and inbreeding management can lead to a variety of serious health problems in individual animals, including fertility issues.

Small animal populations, as well as larger unmanaged groups, can be in the throes of genetic regression, often due to a lack of easy-to-use selection aids that can help breeders to to take decisions.

A breed conservation and management system (BCAS) has been developed and offers breeding recommendations based on the horses’ genetic history. It offers breeders a simple red, amber and green system depending on whether the horses are related and need to be bred.

The Cleveland Bay is an original British breed born three centuries ago in the North East of England, where it was used both as a carriage horse and for working the land.

Since the end of World War I, the breed has undergone a substantial decline in numbers due to the modernization of transportation and the mechanization of agriculture.

By the 1950s he was on the verge of extinction, with only four purebred stallions remaining and is currently one of seven equine breeds listed as priority by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.

The Cleveland Bay Horse Society published its first herdbook in 1885, containing retrospective pedigrees of animals dating back to 1723; this now results in a non-thoroughbred studbook dating back almost 300 years and spanning 38 generations.

The researchers argue that as a result of this work, the Cleveland Bay is now in a genetically sustainable position.

They say their population management tool could be applied to all captive species, from rare and endangered breeds to zoo animals and livestock.

“What we have created is like a family tree for the horses of Cleveland Bay,” said Philippe Wilson, researcher at Nottingham Trent University.

He said: “There are serious and growing concerns about genetic diversity in many breeds. Animals are bred for all kinds of business purposes and for particular traits and qualities, but once the genes are gone, they are gone forever.

“If we don’t have enough purebred individuals, or if a male in a small population breeds with many females for example, it can have a deleterious effect on genetic diversity.”

Dr Andy Dell, researcher at Nottingham Trent University, added: “All cattle must be registered by law and we have created a tool that uses pedigree records and the genetic status of animals to inform strategy. breeding. We have shown that this tool works successfully in improving the genetics of the endangered Cleveland Bay horse population and we can apply our system to other endangered breeds. “

The work, which involved the university’s School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, the University of Lincoln and the Cleveland Bay Horse Society, is published in the journal Ecology and evolution.


Domestic horse breed has third lowest genetic diversity, study finds


More information:
Andrew Dell et al, 16 years of breed management bring substantial genetic improvement to the endangered Cleveland Bay horse population, Ecology and evolution (2021). DOI: 10.1002 / ece3.8118

Provided by Nottingham Trent University

Quote: Saving the genetic diversity of England’s oldest established horse breed (2021, November 9) retrieved November 10, 2021 from https://phys.org/news/2021-11-safeguarding-genetic- diversity-england-oldest.html

This document is subject to copyright. Other than fair use for private study or research purposes, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for information only.


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New genetic tool saves Queen’s favorite horse breed from extinction https://akhalteke.org/new-genetic-tool-saves-queens-favorite-horse-breed-from-extinction/ https://akhalteke.org/new-genetic-tool-saves-queens-favorite-horse-breed-from-extinction/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 19:18:00 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/new-genetic-tool-saves-queens-favorite-horse-breed-from-extinction/ “This was a turning point: the breed could easily have died out if urgent genetic management had not been established,” said Professor Philippe Wilson and Dr Andy Dell of Nottingham Trent University, who set out to create a way for breeders to avoid comparing themselves closely. -Related horses. “Indeed, the breed was already seeing signs […]]]>

“This was a turning point: the breed could easily have died out if urgent genetic management had not been established,” said Professor Philippe Wilson and Dr Andy Dell of Nottingham Trent University, who set out to create a way for breeders to avoid comparing themselves closely. -Related horses.

“Indeed, the breed was already seeing signs of increasing infertility, it was becoming more and more difficult to have full mares, then to bring those who had done so to term and to produce young breeders.

“There was anecdotal evidence for the development of genetically related arthritic and respiratory conditions.”

Inbreeding creates a risk of genetic disease and deformities

If left unchecked, inbreeding can lead to a high level of genetic diseases, shortened lifespan, infertility and deformities.

The Nottingham-based researchers have spent 16 years repairing the damage caused by inbreeding and working on a procedure for the safe and sustainable reproduction of Cleveland berries.

Their primary tool is courtesy of the Cleveland Bay Horse Society, which has herd books dating back to 1885 and pedigree information dating back to 1723.

This extended family tree now contains over 38 generations and is older than the United States of America.

The information on these pages forms the backbone of a new ‘Breed Conservation and Management System’ (BCAS) that allows breeders to see how closely related two Cleveland Bay horses are and if they are. must be prevented from recurring.

Traffic light system prevents mating of closely related horses

Each mare / stallion pair receives a traffic light according to their family link and the risk of consanguinity. Green is encouraged; yellow is “the best of the rest”; orange is not recommended; and red should be avoided “because they are very inbred”.

The use of this tool has prevented the mating of potentially closely related horses and the production of highly inbred offspring and as of 2020 the effective population size was 171 and there are 100 purebred stallions worldwide. , including 41 in the United Kingdom. The inbreeding rate has also dropped to just 0.5 percent.

“The population is certainly now much safer than it was before the work began,” the scientists said.

“The breed is in a much safer position, although it is important to maintain such management practices to prevent such genetic problems from reoccurring.”

Other species and races are suffering a fate similar to that of Cleveland berries, and the BCAS tool could be reconfigured and reused to help them, experts say.

“All livestock must be registered by law and we have created a tool that uses pedigree records and the genetic status of animals to inform breeding strategy,” said Dr Dell.

“We have shown that this tool works successfully in improving the genetics of the endangered Cleveland Bay horse population and we can apply our system to other endangered breeds.

“The BCAS system can be extended to any population with genealogical data, so the potential is obvious. “


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Icelandic horse breed – Horse Illustrated magazine https://akhalteke.org/icelandic-horse-breed-horse-illustrated-magazine/ https://akhalteke.org/icelandic-horse-breed-horse-illustrated-magazine/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 00:29:41 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/icelandic-horse-breed-horse-illustrated-magazine/ Photo Jamen Percy / Shutterstock When Viking settlers first arrived on the island of Iceland in the late 800s, they must have been in awe of its stunning beauty. Huge glaciers, ancient volcanoes, roaring waterfalls and lush forests welcomed immigrant farmers, who brought their animals with them to their new home. Photo by ValerieDurbonPhotography.com Among […]]]>
Photo Jamen Percy / Shutterstock

When Viking settlers first arrived on the island of Iceland in the late 800s, they must have been in awe of its stunning beauty. Huge glaciers, ancient volcanoes, roaring waterfalls and lush forests welcomed immigrant farmers, who brought their animals with them to their new home.

Icelandic horse
Photo by ValerieDurbonPhotography.com

Among the cattle that made the journey from Norway were horses, ancestors of today’s Norwegian fjord. Other settlers from the British Isles soon followed, bringing in blood-carrying Shetland, Exmoor and Highland Pony ponies.

Over the next 1000 years, horses in Iceland remained isolated from the rest of the world. Without the infusion of outside blood and the need to adapt to Iceland’s harsh climate and rugged terrain, a distinct breed of horse was formed. Small enough to survive on the sparse native grasses that grow during the colder winter months, but strong enough to work on the farm and carry an adult rider, the Icelandic breed has become an integral part of Icelandic life.

Today’s Icelandic horses are the descendants of horses that have survived for centuries in this harsh land. Thanks to a law enacted in 982, no horse is allowed to enter Iceland, and horses that leave are never allowed to return. Thus, the Icelandic equine gene pool has remained pure for 1000 years.

Icelandic horse tölt
The tölt is the Icelandic’s gentle four-stroke gait, where at least one foot is still on the ground. Pictured: Antje Freygang of Icelandic Montaire horses on Vaskur Fra Kadarholi. Photo by ValerieDurbonPhotography.com

Unique characteristics

Due to its special history, the Icelandic horse is truly unique in the equine world. Its long period of isolation, along with careful breeding by the Icelanders, allowed the breed to maintain a classic appearance, movement and temperament.

In addition to their compact form and shaggy mane and tail, the Icelandic has special gaits not seen in any other breed. Every Icelandic is born with the ability to walk, trot, gallop and gallop like other breeds, as well as perform the four-stroke tölt. Some are also born with another gait called the flying gait.

Horses in Iceland
Treks through Iceland on horseback are on the wish lists of many riders. Photo by Blue Planet Studio / Shutterstock

The tölt, the most comfortable of Icelandic gaits, is a lateral movement where at least one foot is always on the ground. The two-stroke flight pace is the fastest of the Icelandic gaits, with speeds reaching 30 mph. In Iceland, horses run at this pace.

The temperament of the Icelandic horse is as precious as its distinctive appearance and its particular way of doing. The ideal Icelandic has a very easy going personality and is virtually bombproof. The breed’s lack of dread dates back to its isolation in its native land where horses have no natural predators.

In Iceland, these horses are an integral part of the country’s tourism industry, offering rides through the spectacular countryside during the warmer months. Horses transport visitors over lava fields and volcanic landscapes, giving a perspective of Iceland that you can only get from the back of a horse.

Icelandic horse
With no new horses licensed for 1,000 years, the Icelandic horse has retained its distinctive characteristics. Photo by Karel Cerny / Shutterstock

In the USA

Although Icelandic horses are the most numerous in their country of origin (around 80,000 currently reside in Iceland), 6,248 horses are registered with the American Icelandic Horse Congress (USIHC). They are valued in the United States as recreational, touring, and family horses.

In USIHC sponsored competitions across the country, the breed is judged at its five gaits according to the rules of the International Federation of Icelandic Horse Associations (FEIF). The FEIF is an association of 19 different countries where the Icelandic horse is represented, and is the international governing association for the breed.

Icelandic horse
The Icelandic horse, although technically the size of a pony, is still referred to as a horse due to tradition, its ability to carry weight, its fiery character, and its ability to do all horse-related things. Photo by Menno Schaefer / Shutterstock

Every two years, a different FEIF member country hosts the Icelandic Horse World Championships, where Icelandic horses from all over the world compete against each other. All over the world, the Icelandic Horse is judged on the quality of its five gaits. The courses are organized by division and include open, intermediate, novice, youth, beginner riders and green horses.

In the United States, the United States Icelandic Horse Congress has a Recreational Riding Department that operates a Sea 2 Shining Sea Ride, which is a virtual ride where members log hours in order to travel to across parts of the United States.
Another virtual competition for all levels of riders is currently under development to help Icelandic horse owners stay involved in shows during the COVID-19 shutdown.

The Icelandic is a sturdy little horse with great strength, endurance and temperament. As its popularity continues to grow outside of its native Iceland, more and more people appreciate the unique beauty and talents of this special breed.

Fast facts on Icelandic horses

Height: 13 to 14 hands

Color: Mostly brown, berry, black and brown; dun, cream, silver, roan and pinto are sometimes seen.

Overall appearance: Rectangular and compact shape; long and thick mane and tail. Head well defined, proud and alert.

This article on the Icelandic horse breed appeared in the July 2020 issue of Illustrated horse magazine. Click here to subscribe !


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Spotlight on Arabian Horse Breeds – Young Rider https://akhalteke.org/spotlight-on-arabian-horse-breeds-young-rider/ https://akhalteke.org/spotlight-on-arabian-horse-breeds-young-rider/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://akhalteke.org/spotlight-on-arabian-horse-breeds-young-rider/ Photo by Alexia Khruscheva / Shutterstock Picture this scene: A glorious black Arabian stallion swims mightily in the ocean following a shipwreck, pulling you to the safety of a desert island where you will later learn to ride it. It could happen if you are Alec Ramsey in The black stallion movie and book, but […]]]>
Photo by Alexia Khruscheva / Shutterstock

Picture this scene: A glorious black Arabian stallion swims mightily in the ocean following a shipwreck, pulling you to the safety of a desert island where you will later learn to ride it.

It could happen if you are Alec Ramsey in The black stallion movie and book, but even if you haven’t been shipwrecked on an island with a wild stallion, you’ve probably seen Arabian horses in the stable or at horse shows. The Arab is a beautiful breed capable of many different jobs.

Why are Arabian horses famous?

A breed of lightweight horses that measure between 14.1 and 15.3 hands (although 15.1 is more common on the high end), Arabian horses have been valued for centuries for their endurance and versatility. But Arabs are also famous for their distinctive beauty and presence. How does the appearance of the Arab distinguish him from other races?

Young Rider Magazine LogoPart of the reason is surely the sculpted head of the Arab, who sports a strongly rounded face and large eyes prominently on the sides of the face. The muzzle of the Arab is small, but the nostrils are flared, which also adds to the dramatic appearance of this breed. There is an unmistakable elegance in the Arab that contributes to his distinctive type, stemming from his arched neck and graceful body.

You’ll find Arabs in four different coat colors: bay, black, brown, and gray, sometimes with occasional roars caused by coat patterns like the rabicano. Gray is something of a classic Arab color, and many foundation stallions were gray, including the imported Raffles and Skowronek.

Race - Arabian Horse;  Discipline - Endurance
Arabs are well known to excel at endurance. Photo courtesy of the Young Arab Horses Association

How is the skeleton of an Arab different?

If you study the conformation of many breeds of horses, you may notice that the Arabian tends to have a shorter back than other breeds, as well as a high tail and a flat rump. There is a good reason for this: Most Arabs actually have a slightly different skeletal structure than other breeds of horses.

In addition to having a higher bone density than other breeds, Arabs generally have one rib less and only have five lumbar vertebrae in their backs instead of six, which results in a shorter back. In addition, their tail is missing two vertebrae, which could contribute to the Arab’s tendency to lift its tail high when excited.

Arab Western Pleasure
The versatile Arabian is an excellent partner for Western or English riding. Photo by Paulette Johnson

How versatile is an Arabian horse?

The fiery Arab has no shortage of talent when it comes to competition or performance. Arabs are used in races and also participate in endurance riding, where the horse and rider go on long-distance treks of 50 or 100 miles.

And whether it’s a local open show or an Arab-bred show, you’ll find Arabs competing in the fields of hunting, western fun, English fun, dressage, jumping, saddle seat, reining, cup and many other disciplines, in addition to the hand conformation and staging course. Even if you initially think that Arabs are riding horses, you will also find some who compete in pleasure driving.

Arabs also excel outside of competition, whether it’s a leisurely descent on a trail or a low-key stroll around the open-air arena.

Arabian horse
Arabs are easily recognized by their bulging faces and graceful movements. Photo by Robert Peek / Shutterstock

Are Arabian Horses Good For Beginners?

If you are interested in Arabian horses and want to learn more about them, you might be interested in the Arabian Horse Association’s Discovery Farm program. This program is an opportunity for novice riders to meet Arabian horses and learn from informative farm owners who wish to share their knowledge about Arabs.

For thousands of years, people have cherished their alliance with the Arabian horse. And when you go up or watch an Arab, remember that you are participating in that connection and helping to write the last chapter in the history of the Arab.

Arabs and scholarships

The association of the Arabian horse
◆ Grants from the national Arab horse judging competition
◆ Arabian Horse Youth Association Board Scholarships
◆ Club and affiliate scholarships

The Arab Horse Foundation

In a single, convenient location, the Arabian Horse Foundation allows students to complete a single application which automatically makes them eligible for all commemorative and regional scholarships.

The Foundation awards scholarships to high school students who have represented the Arab race in a positive way, have achieved good results in their studies, and have been excellent members of their community. The research branch of the Foundation is committed to supporting equine research aimed at improving the health of the Arabian breed.

Important dates in Arab history

About. 2500 BC: The ancestors of Arabian horses reside in the deserts of the Middle East and are loved by the Bedouin people.

1724: The Arabian Godolphin was born. He would later become one of the most influential stallions in thoroughbred history.

1770s: George Washington rides Blueskin, a half Arab, throughout the War of Independence.

1888: The first purebred Arab breeding program is established in the United States.

1908: The Arabian Horse Club of America (now the Arabian Horse Association) is established and 71 purebred Arabs are registered. Over a million Arabian horses were registered in 2020.

1926: WK Kellogg (of Kellogg Cereal fame) imports Arabs and establishes Kellogg Ranch.

1926: Stallion * Raffles was born at Lady Wentworth’s Crabbet Arabian Stud in Sussex, England. He arrived in the United States in the 1930s and began his influential contribution to Arab breeding in the United States.

1941: that of Walter Farley The black stallion is published.

1948: that of Marguerite Henry King of the Wind: The Story of the Arabian Godolphin was published, and he won the Newbery Medal in 1949 for his outstanding contribution to children’s literature.

1956: The stallion * Bask ++ was born in Poland. He was then imported to the United States, where he subsequently sired more than 1,000 foals.

1993: An Arabian stallion named JB Kobask makes his debut as “Thunder”, an official mascot of the Denver Broncos football team. Two other Arabian geldings also served as Thunder II and Thunder III, respectively.

2003: The Arabian Horse Association is formed by a merger between the International Arabian Horse Association (IAHA) and the Arabian Horse Registry of America (AHRA). It becomes the official register of the breed.

This article on the Arabian horse breed appeared in the Spring 2020 issue of Young Rider magazine. Click here to subscribe !


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